10‏/10‏/2016

Warm Up Activities


Warm Up Activities 



Thankfulness Post-its:

 Students write down what they are thankful for on a post-it. You can have a designated space for the post-it. 

 Encouragement Letters

Write an encouragement statement to a stranger then post it around school.  This would also be neat to see the target language all over school.

Throwback Thursday: 

Bring in a picture of yourself from when you were younger and describe it in the target language.  Students bring in photos and describe themselves as well

Make the longest words

Write a topical target word vertically down the board, for example, WINTER. Ask the students to come up with the longest word that begins with each letter. Give teams a point per word and a bonus point for the longest.
    Waterfall
   Industrious 
   Nausea
   Terrified
  Empty

   Retailer



What does your name mean?

Using a dictionary, google or any other resource, students find and write down an appropriate adjective that begins with each letter of their first name

Mixed up sentence

Write a sentence on the board but mix up the word order, then challenge students to reconstruct the original sentence. 

Mixed up sentence (anagram variation)

Write a sentence on the board but this time scramble the letters of each word. For example:
hwy ddint’ I dusty draher ta vieyunrsit?

What do you know about bananas?

Set a 5 minute time limit and in groups have students think up and write down as many facts as they can about bananas or any other topic.

How many sounds can you hear?

Students sit in silence for two minutes and write down every sound that they hear. 

A to Z race

Give students a theme, for example, jobs, things you take on holiday, food. Write the letters A to Z on the board. Students write an appropriate word beginning with each letter. 

Name ten

Have students think of 10 items that fit a certain criteria. For example:
  • Jobs where you have to wear a uniform
  • English football clubs
  • Sports that are played with a ball
  • Foods that contain egg
  • Animals that lay eggs
  • Three letter parts of the body – eye, arm, leg, hip, ear, toe jaw, rib, lip, gum

Three things in common

This is a great icebreaker, but you can also use it as a lead-in to a theme or to test your students’ knowledge of a grammar point. Simply ask students to work in pairs and find three things that they have in common and then report back to the class. You can narrow the topic down to areas like: three things we both did at the weekend, three foods we both like, three things we both don’t like about this city,three things neither of us have done yet but would like to, etc.

Can’t Say Yes or No

The object of this warm up is to not say “yes,” or “no.” Students ask each other questions to try to get the other members of their group to say “yes,” or “no.” The other members must answer the questions, but without saying “yes,” or “no.” It’s a fun activity that requires students to think on their feet.

For more ideas , check this website:

http://busyteacher.org/teaching_ideas_and_techniques/warmers/







Warm Up Activities



Thankfulness Post-its: Students write down what they are thankful for on a post-it. You can have a designated space for the post-it. 

Encouragement Letters: Write an encouragement statement to a stranger then post it around school.  This would also be neat to see the target language all over school.

Throwback Thursday: Bring in a picture of yourself from when you were younger and describe it in the target language.  Students bring in photos and describe themselves as well!

Make the longest words

Write a topical target word vertically down the board, for example, WINTER. Ask the students to come up with the longest word that begins with each letter. Give teams a point per word and a bonus point for the longest.
   Waterfall
   Industrious 
   Nausea
   Terrified
   Empty
   Retailer





24‏/10‏/2015

5 Games for Speaking, Listening & Thinking


5 Games for Speaking, Listening & Thinking


The games are great for developing speaking and listening skills, and thinking and reasoning abilities.


1. How many? 
This simple game started  by asking a question about a specific animal  and she would call out as many responses as she could think of;
  • How many animals can you name that eat leaves?
  • How many animals can you name that live in the sea?
  • How many insects can you name that have six legs?
  • How many vehicles can you name with four wheels?
  • How many things can you name that are cone shaped?
  • How many things can you name that can fly?

2. I’m thinking of…: 
A simplified version of 20 questions, and somewhat easier than I Spy we start this game with a single object in mind and the phrase, “I am thinking of something ….,” and then name a feature or attribute of the object or thing. So it might begin, “I am thinking of something that is blue.” The other person is welcome to make a guess or ask for another clue and we go back and forth between clues and guesses until they work out the correct answer.
3. Guess who? 
We started by focusing on a storybook or movie character or an actual movie instead of an object.
4. Secret Message: 
This well known game is best played with a group of children from kindergarten age upwards. Everyone sits in a line or circle and the first person whispers a short message to the next person in line, with the message then being passed from person to person in whispers along the line or around the circle. The last person announces the message they have heard to the whole group and everyone has a good laugh at how the message had invariably changed as it has been passed along.
5. Sound tennis: 
Great for children . The players agree on a sound, say ‘P,’ and then take turns back and forth, each saying a new word that begins with that sound, until the round comes to a finish when one player cannot think of a new word beginning with the nominated sound. We allow the other player, the ‘winner,’ to choose the new sound for the next round.